Behind The Crematorium Operations

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, an average of 159,000 deceased is recorded in Australia every year. For those living in urban areas, 70 per cent chose to have cremation while in non-urban areas there are 56 per cent. This is why the business of adult cremation urns is popular in Australia.

While many chose cremation, only a small percentage is aware of what is happening during the actual process. Most shy away from the prospect of witnessing but for people who are working in the said industry, there is no escaping the fact that they have to watch it multiple times every day.

David Bennett, a crematorium operator in one of the biggest facility in Australia, has been on the job for three years. He shared how the crematorium started in 1933 and since then they have already cremated more than 357,000.

Every Monday, the crematorium is operating quietly because this is when funeral directors send only around 10 bodies to them but the same cannot be said every Friday where they have to handle over 30 bodies.

The process starts when the body comes in and it was tagged with a metal name plate which shows a unique number in order for them to trace it easily. The name plates stay with the ashes until it is time to turn over to the family in order to avoid mix ups. Surveillance cameras are also recording all the time to make sure their work is monitored.

They have to make sure that the body is free from pacemakers because it can cause the cremator to explode and they would end up with very expensive repair costing $110,000.

There are three steel cremators used inside the crematorium and all of them are controlled by computer with a handheld control. The computer screen shows the temperatures, suction, smoke and gas. The furnace temperature should be controlled – not below 800 or over 1000 degrees C. For an average body meant for adult cremation urns, the cremation can take 1.5 hours. After the cremation, the ashes are placed inside the ash box and the family will be the one to decide where to keep or spread the ashes.