New Mexico Treasures Their Heritage Technology When It Comes To Plastering

In these modern times where plasterers in Sydney and all over the world are suing drywall, paint and wallpaper to make a wall look better, there is still parts of the world that uses their heritage technology in plastering. This is what is being preserved in a place in the northern part of New Mexico. The town of Santa Fe still looks back to its ancestral days when skills of the old era are used to make beautiful walls. Despite the availability of modern methods, there is high demand for this particular skill.

The technique they use employs organic method such that adobe walls are covered with mud plaster for its finishing. The American Southwest part of the world has been preserving this method for many centuries. It is evident not only in pueblos and rural villages but also in the adobe houses owned by rich locals. Majority of the plaster mixture they used utilize a gypsum formulation that is readily bought and packaged such as the brands from Structolite and Red Top. Builders have the affinity to make one room standout such as using mud plaster in a single room while the rests have shinier and lighter finishing like Structolite.

The owner of Palo Santo Designs, Mark Giorgetti, admits that he adores the earthen plaster technique. He moved to Santa Fe around two decades ago and was employed by Paula Baker and Robert LaPorte in their team of builder and architect. He saw how the two promotes the use of earthen plasters and natural materials on walls and floors.

Giorgetti added that through his employment, he got to know Charlie Carruthers who is known as a treasure locally because of his extensive knowledge when it comes to earthen materials used in plastering. They entered a partnership that is on and off for many years.

Back in the old days, sealant used for dirt floors in New Mexico is the blood of ox but nowadays the binder used is from linseed oil. Despite the modern methods, mudding is still prevalent in these areas and plasterers in Sydney could learn a thing or two from these practices in creating hard finish for walls and floors.