After Alterations

As I was having lunch with one of my colleagues at the office, I noticed how everything in the workspace seemed so, I don’t know, properly spaced out, I guess? Though, I believe, “properly positioned” would be more appropriate, I think.  My colleague pointed out that the higher-ups did some reviews after the relocation in the office space.  She said that the staff went around, asking for the employees’ opinions on the office layout, and made adjustments based on the data gathered. It sounded tedious. My colleague said it was.

But here’s the thing, the office space feels right. It’s not too open, or too cramped; it’s comfortable here. My other colleagues say that, as tedious as those reviews and the consequential minor alterations to the office space were, the end result was well worth it.

That’s when it occurred to me how important those reviews were. It was the perspective of the employees themselves, the people who moved around the office, carrying bags, files, and other office stuff, so what they thought and felt about the layout post-relocation is very important. Ok, rule of thumb is it’s a good idea to get your subordinates’ opinion on things. Not really relevant, I know, but I just felt like saying it. See, the nicest commercial office fitouts in the world aren’t going to matter if you don’t place them properly. I asked my colleagues how it was before, and general consensus is that the relocation was a massive improvement.

To reiterate, it’s important that, after any alteration to the office space, or any space, for that matter, that one take the time and effort to review the results. Phrased like that, it seems that that should be a general rule for any sort of endeavour, but, your mileage may vary on that. All the same, ensuring that the end result achieved what you wanted it to do may take time and effort, but doing so saves trouble in the long run two-fold; one: if your plan for the alteration includes a certain task/goal/target, then no need to readjust anything when you chance upon it, and two: you can spot any faults, mistakes, or flaws early, allowing you to fix them before they escalate.

That’s my ten cents, I hope you find them of some use.